The South Asian Network to Address Masculinities (SANAM) is a network of NGOs (national and regional), academics and activists who believe that the toxicity of masculinities needs to be challenged if we are to dream of a violence free world. Masculinities and violence, it has been suggested, are inextricably linked in creating and maintaining all forms of inequalities. SANAM provides a platform for South Asians to work together in developing a culture of resistance to gender based violence.
 
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DEMO TEXT The first phase of SANAM was dedicated to developing a curriculum on understanding gender- based violence and its intersection with masculinities and rolling out an action oriented fellowship programme based on this curriculum.

The idea behind formulating this curriculum and its implementation was that effective primary prevention requires the generation and application of skills that facilitate

i)                    a critical understanding of methods, tools and theories that formulate violence prevention programmes,

ii)                  a knowledge base that sharpens the understanding that masculinities, gender and violence need to be located at the intersection of social, historical and economic processes

The SANAM focus was arrived at through a series of discussions that took into account the current range of interventions in the region, the tools that were employed within these interventions, available training programmes and theories of social change & transformation. The group decided that since this was a melting pot of groups and individuals who had been working in the field of violence prevention through various means for more than a decade, the pooling together of knowledge and experience could be a significant contribution in catalysing and developing violence prevention efforts in the region. SANAM thus, defined its role as a catalyst that would generate more effective and critical knowledge on prevention methods, skills and approaches and at the same time create an ever expanding pool of activists, researchers and academicians   who would develop interventions in different social settings and expand the body of knowledge around masculinities. SANAM sees the effectiveness of prevention in a constant dialogue between theory, experience, intervention and change. It also sees the long term importance of developing several nodes of resistance and prevention, a rainbow coalition that can address the hydra headed monster of gender-based violence from different positions and routes.

The SANAM curriculum and fellowship programme on masculinities and gender-based violence was thus formulated to create several fronts of prevention and the success of this idea became more than apparent through the projects that were undertaken by the fellows, who participated in the capacity development process. The range of knowledge pieces and prevention strategies on violence that have emerged from these projects is a clear indicator of the importance of multiple sites of resistance as well as a rigorous engagement with knowledge on masculinities, methods and tools. The 30 or so projects on masculinities and violence prevention that have emerged include, in addition to development of training manuals and tools, explorations of themes such as conflict zones, political spaces, religion, media and popular culture, mental health, gender based violence, sexualities and diverse sexual identities. The diversity of the social settings of the projects also represent a fascinating portrayal of the complexity of the subject that masculinities intervention seeks to address; from specific ethnic and indigenous groups of men across South Asia, school going boys, male marriage migrants, transgender persons, to male sex workers, truckers, boys living on the street and families coping with bereavement in war.

NAME
COUNTRY
YEAR
TITLE
FILE
Md. Faruque Hossain Bangladesh 2012 Module on Workshop on Maculinity & Better School Environment Project – Md. Faruque Hossain
Mehbuba Jabin Bangladesh 2012 Use of ICT, Masculinity, and Enactment of Violence: A study among young men in Bangladesh Project – Mehbuba Jabin
Md. Nazmul Ahsan Bangladesh 2012 Study Report on How masculinities are constructed at rural schools in southern Bangladesh and manifested in discrimination towards girls. Project – Md. Nazmul Ahsan
Parboti Roy Bangladesh 2012 Ethnic Conflict and Masculinities: A Study on the Impact of Conflict on Indigenous Men in Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh Project – Parboti Roy
Md. Sirajul Islam Bangladesh 2012 Construction of Masculinity among child labours in rural agricultural sector Project – Md. Sirajul Islam
Ankur Srivastava India 2012 Exploring the inter-linkages between sexuality, gender expression and work among men who sell sex to men in Mumbai, India Project – Ankur Srivastava
Gee Amina Sultan India 2012
Gowhar Fazili India 2012 Languages of Grief: Understanding Masculinity through Public and Familial forms of Grief Project – Gowhar Fazili
Ishita Sharma India 2012 Fractures selves, healing spaces Project – Ishita Sharma
Meet Tara Dnyaneshwar India 2012 Fathers’ Masculinity and the Daughters’ resultant struggle with life: The Daughters Speak Project – Meet Tara Dnyaneshwar
Rabindra Singh Jeena India 2012
Sanjay Singh India 2012 Construction of Masculinity in Bhojpuri regions of Uttar Pradesh Project – Sanjay Singh
Santosh Kumar Giri India 2012 Where are we? Hum kahan? – Male-born TGs married to women Project – Santosh Kumar Giri
Urvashi Gandhi India 2012 Workbook for young men on Violence and Masculinities Project – Urvashi Gandhi
Urvija Priyadarshini India 2012 Exploring “Bhakti” as a site for examining hegemonic masculinities in India Project – Urvija Priyadarshini
Babu Ram Poudel Nepal 2012 Study report on impact of Masculinities on Gender-based violence related Mediated cases of Kurtha VDC of Dhanusha District of Nepal Project – Babu Ram Poudel
Dinesh Jung Khati Nepal 2012 Exploration of Masculinities among Dalit Men and Boys in Dolkha District in Nepal Project – Dinesh Jung Khati
Durga Thapa Nepal 2012 Final Report – Workshop on Understanding Masculinity within LGBT Group, Kathmandu, Nepal Project – Durga Thapa
Kumar Paudel Nepal 2012 Streets Our Way (Masculinities among Street Children of Kathmandu): A Photographic Essay Project – Kumar Paudel
Radha Paudel Nepal 2012 A research report on “Understanding Masculinities in Public Transport”, Kathmandu, Nepal Project – Radha Paudel
Shanti Uprety Nepal 2012 Exploring the Prevalence of Masculinities in the Functioning of the Political Parties in Nepal Project – Shanti Uprety
Adeel Pathan Pakistan 2012 How Pakistani Electronic Media (News and Current affairs programs) portrays Nationalistic Masculinities with reference to Veena Malik Project – Adeel Pathan
Ahmad Zeb Swatay Pakistan 2012 Analysis of the Pressures of Masculinity: The case of Pakhtun men/boys in district Swat Project – Ahmad Zeb
Aisha Anees Malik Pakistan 2012 Masculinity and Pakistani Male Marriage Migrants Project – Aisha Anees Malik
Arsala Khan Kakar Pakistan 2012 A Study of Masculinity in Pashto folk poetry of Gharra, a genre of Pashto folk poetry Project – Arsala Khan Kakar
Muhammad Rafique Wassan Pakistan 2012 Masculinity & Honor Crimes against Women in Sindh, Pakistan Project – Muhammad Rafique Wassan
Saadia Abid Pakistan 2012 Enculturing Masculinity: Young boys learning gender performativity Project – Saadia Abid
Zaheer Abbas Pakistan 2012 Masculinities, Sexual Health of Truck Drivers and Role of Traditional Healers Project – Zaheer Abbas

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DEMO TEXT The first phase of SANAM was dedicated to developing a curriculum on understanding gender- based violence and its intersection with masculinities and rolling out an action oriented fellowship programme based on this curriculum.

The idea behind formulating this curriculum and its implementation was that effective primary prevention requires the generation and application of skills that facilitate

i)                    a critical understanding of methods, tools and theories that formulate violence prevention programmes,

ii)                  a knowledge base that sharpens the understanding that masculinities, gender and violence need to be located at the intersection of social, historical and economic processes

The SANAM focus was arrived at through a series of discussions that took into account the current range of interventions in the region, the tools that were employed within these interventions, available training programmes and theories of social change & transformation. The group decided that since this was a melting pot of groups and individuals who had been working in the field of violence prevention through various means for more than a decade, the pooling together of knowledge and experience could be a significant contribution in catalysing and developing violence prevention efforts in the region. SANAM thus, defined its role as a catalyst that would generate more effective and critical knowledge on prevention methods, skills and approaches and at the same time create an ever expanding pool of activists, researchers and academicians   who would develop interventions in different social settings and expand the body of knowledge around masculinities. SANAM sees the effectiveness of prevention in a constant dialogue between theory, experience, intervention and change. It also sees the long term importance of developing several nodes of resistance and prevention, a rainbow coalition that can address the hydra headed monster of gender-based violence from different positions and routes.

The SANAM curriculum and fellowship programme on masculinities and gender-based violence was thus formulated to create several fronts of prevention and the success of this idea became more than apparent through the projects that were undertaken by the fellows, who participated in the capacity development process. The range of knowledge pieces and prevention strategies on violence that have emerged from these projects is a clear indicator of the importance of multiple sites of resistance as well as a rigorous engagement with knowledge on masculinities, methods and tools. The 30 or so projects on masculinities and violence prevention that have emerged include, in addition to development of training manuals and tools, explorations of themes such as conflict zones, political spaces, religion, media and popular culture, mental health, gender based violence, sexualities and diverse sexual identities. The diversity of the social settings of the projects also represent a fascinating portrayal of the complexity of the subject that masculinities intervention seeks to address; from specific ethnic and indigenous groups of men across South Asia, school going boys, male marriage migrants, transgender persons, to male sex workers, truckers, boys living on the street and families coping with bereavement in war.